Honours bouquet for Bath in Bloom Awards.

Honours bouquet for Bath in Bloom Awards.

Bath and North East Somerset has collected a bouquet of top honours in this year’s Southwest in Bloom Awards.

bath in bloom Bath won gold and was category winner in the Southwest in Bloom competition. The city also won the Sponsors Cup for the most meritorious entry and there were special 50th anniversary awards for Stan Hitt MBE and Bill Bailey, both formally of the Parks Department.

Keynsham Memorial Park won Gold and Alexandra Park won a silver gilt in the parks award and St Stephens allotments a silver gilt in the allotments category. Radstock won gold in the Champion of Champions category and Midsomer Norton won gold and was a category winner,

Other towns and villages in the area also took gold and silver gilt: Paulton and Camerton both won gold awards with Keynsham, Chew Magna and Temple Cloud all winning silver gilt.

The awards were presented at an RHS awards ceremony on Thursday 18th September at Trowbridge Civic Centre.

bath in bloomThe city also won 11 ‘outstanding’ awards from 22 entries as part of the Royal Horticultural Society’s annual It’s Your Neighbour awards. It’s Your Neighbourhood is a grassroots community gardening campaign helping people to make lasting improvements to their local areas.

Councillor David Dixon, (Lib-Dem, Oldfield), Bath & North East Somerset Council’s Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods, said: “It has been a quite extraordinary year for Bath’s entries. The results are quite amazing and prove what incredible community groups we have in Bath.”

Barry Cruse MBE, Chairman of the Bath in Bloom Committee, said: “I am so pleased that in this special 50th anniversary year our county has done so well, with gold’s and silver gilts going to the towns and villages and high levels of achievement from the 60-plus community groups that entered the It’s Your Neighbourhood scheme.”

Outstanding (level 5) awards went to Batheaston Primary School, Bath City Farm, Alice Park community garden, Weston Trio, St Stephen’s Church, Primrose Hill community woodland, Milsom Place, Chandler Close Residents’ Association, Weston Village Gardening Club, Friends of the Royal United Hospital and the On Board community group.

In addition, five groups achieved a thriving (level 4) award: Barrow Hamlet, the Millstream Project, Friends of Alexandra Park forum, Beechen Bees and Weston All Saints Primary School.

The Jews Lane Project, Grow Snowhill, Bradford Road Gardening Club, and Dorothy House Outreach Centre all achieved a developing (level 3) awards, while Cavendish Cooks achieved an improving (level 2) award.

The RHS It’s Your Neighbourhood campaign supports community groups in cleaning up and greening up their immediate local environment – whether that’s the street they live in, or a small patch of communal land needing a revamp. Any group can join as long as it is volunteer-led and involved in hands-on community gardening.

Results for It’s Your Neighbour Awards:
1. Bath – Dorothy House Outreach Centre (Developing)
2. Bath – Friends of Alexandra Park Forum (Thriving)
3. Bath – Alice Park Community Garden (Outstanding)
4. Bath – Barrow Hamlet (Thriving)
5. Bath – Batheaston Primary School (Outstanding)
6. Bath – Beechen Bees (Thriving)
7. Bath – Bradford Road Gardening Group (Developing)
8. Bath – Cavendish Cooks (Improving)
9. Bath – Grow Snowhill (Developing)
10. Bath – Jews Lane Project (Developing)
11. Bath – Milsom Place (Outstanding)
12. Bath – Monksdale Community Plot (Thriving)
13. Bath – Primrose Hill Community Woodland (Outstanding)
14. Bath – St. Stephens Church (Outstanding)
15. Bath – Weston All Saints Primary School (Thriving)
16. Bath – Weston Trio (Outstanding)
17. Bath Chandler Close & M.B.E.Residents Association (Changler
Rangers) (Outstanding)
18. Bath City Farm (Outstanding)
19. Bath Millstream Project (Thriving)
20. Bath Weston Village Garden Club (Outstanding)
21. Bath – Friends of the Royal United Hospital (Outstanding)
22. Bath – On-Board Community Project (Outstanding)
23. Camerton – Coke Ovens Copse (Thriving)
24. Camerton – St. Peter’s Church, Camerton (Thriving)
25. Camerton Batch Local Nature Reserve (Outstanding)
26. Camerton Church Primary School (Thriving)
27. Camerton Community Hall (Thriving)
28. Camerton Court (Outstanding)
29. Keynsham – Baptist Church (Ebenezer Chapel) (Outstanding)
30. Keynsham – Castle Primary School (Improving)
31. Keynsham – Friends of Manor Road Community Woodland (Thriving)
32. Keynsham – Homeavon Community (Establishing)
33. Keynsham – Neighbour Hoodies Time Out Task Force (Improving)
34. Keynsham – Sirona Day Care Services (Establishing)
35. Keynsham – St Dunstan’s Catholic Church (Outstanding)
36. Keynsham Railway Station (Developing)
37. Keynsham Scout Group (Outstanding)
38. Keynsham Wombles (Thriving)
39. Keynsham Transition – Community Veg Plot (Thriving)
40. Midsomer Norton – St Johns Primary School (Outstanding)
41. Midsomer Norton – Silver Street Local Nature Reserve (Outstanding)
42. Midsomer Norton – The Hollies Gardens (Outstanding)
43. Midsomer Norton – Wansdyke Play Association (Outstanding)
44. Midsomer Norton Community Allotments Association (Developing)
45. Midsomer Norton Methodist Church (Thriving)
46. Midsomer Norton Primary School (Thriving)
47. Midsomer Norton Swallow Housing (Outstanding)
48. Midsomer Norton – River Somer Management Team (Outstanding)
49. Midsomer Norton – Somerset & Dorset Railway Heritage Trust (Thriving)
50. Midsomer Norton – Welton Afterschool Club Initiative (Developing)
51. Midsomer Norton – Welton Primary School (Developing)
52. Midsomer Norton – Welton Village Group (Developing)
53. Paulton – Baptist Church Garden (Improving)
54. Paulton – Cultivate With Colliver (Cultivate) (Developing)
55. Paulton – Fieldways Substation (Improving)
56. Paulton – Friends and Residents of Laurel Drive (Improving)
57. Paulton – Holy Trinity Church (Developing)
58. Paulton – The Lamb Inn (Developing)
59. Paulton – Wesley Hall Back Garden (Developing)
60. Paulton Junior School Gardening Club (Outstanding)
61. Paulton Nature Reserve (Thriving)
62. Paulton Noah’s Ark Preschool (Developing)
63. Radstock – Chapel Court Wildlife Garden (Developing)
64. Radstock – Connections Gardens (Outstanding)
65. Radstock – Haydon Heritage (Outstanding)
66. Radstock – Meadow View Residents (Outstanding)
67. Radstock – Methodist Church (Outstanding)
68. Radstock – RADCO Staff Volunteers (Thriving)
69. Radstock – St Nicholas Church Graveyard (Thriving)
70. Radstock – The Academy of Trinity (Outstanding)
71. Radstock – The Fromeway Inn (Thriving)
72. Radstock – Walnut Buildings Garden (Developing)
73. Radstock – Writhlington – St Mary’s CE School (Outstanding)
74. Radstock – Writhlington Allotments (Developing)
75. Radstock – Writhlington Community School Orchid Project (Outstanding)
76. Radstock – Clandown Orchard Project (Establishing)

New Keynsham Civic Centre to include solar power

New Keynsham Civic Centre to include solar power

 

Bath & North East Somerset Council is on track to complete its £34 million redevelopment of Keynsham by the Autumn.

The Council is working with the local community to revitalise the town with new jobs, new homes, and a revamped town centre. Plans include making better use of the existing town hall site to improve the town centre and encourage more private sector investment into Keynsham.

The new Keynsham Civic Centre

The new Keynsham Civic Centre

A Sainsbury’s Local was last month confirmed as the first letting for the development, and will create 20 to 25 full and part job opportunities. The Council has confirmed that Loungers cafe has agreed to take the unit behind Sainsbury’s, overlooking the park and a further unnamed occupier is relocating from Riverside. The Council is proactively marketing the remaining units and negotiations are underway on a number of these.

The new buildings will be known as the Keynsham Civic Centre, and will incorporate Bath & North East Somerset Council’s Offices, the One Stop Shop and retail units. The Council has also confirmed that a new street being created between the buildings will be called Market Walk, which links to the history of this part of the town, as well as looking to the future when there will be market stalls at this location.

Keynsham Civic Centre will be amongst the most energy-efficient in the country, with work to install one of the largest council-owned solar panel systems in the UK now completed.

Solar panels being installed at Keynsham.

Solar panels being installed at Keynsham.

The 750 solar panels – which cover an area equivalent to more than four tennis courts – will generate over 230,000 units of electricity each year, equivalent to the annual energy use of almost 70 homes. This will benefit the Council by around £50,000 every year, and reduce annual CO2 emissions by 125 tonnes. Over 20 years the benefits are expected to reach almost £1.5 million, and avoid CO2 emissions of 2,355 tonnes.

Cllr David Bellotti (LibDem, Lyncombe), the Council’s Cabinet Member for Community Resources, said: “This is a very exciting time for Keynsham and I have no doubt that this development will provide a real boost to the local economy with the creation of new jobs, better shopping facilities and a more attractive town centre.

“It is also a key part of the Council’s contribution to the district-wide carbon emission reduction target of 45% by 2026. Our Council office will be an ultra-low carbon building that has virtually no heating and cooling requirement because it will have natural ventilation and high levels of insulation. By generating our own solar energy on-site we will drastically reduce the building’s running costs and will also generate a stable income through the feed-in tariff.

“Not only will this benefit the environment, it will also save the Council and local taxpayers money which can be used to support essential frontline services.”

The development work is being carried out by Willmott Dixon while the solar installation was designed and installed by Solarsense.

For more information on Bath & North East Somerset Council’s regeneration of Keynsham town Centre, visit: http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/keynshamregen.

Keynsham mosaics to get new home

Keynsham mosaics to get new home

 

The panel array that will be sunk in the floor at the new Civic Centre

The panel array that will be sunk in the floor at the new Civic Centre

Work is well underway now to prepare a selection of mosaic panels -

The panel that will eventually hang on the wall.

The panel that will eventually hang on the wall.

from the Durley Hill Roman villa – for a new home in the £34 million Civic Centre which is nearing completion in Keynsham.

Visitors to the town’s Pixash Lane Archaeology Store today (Saturday, May 10th) were able to see how they are being cleaned and conserved by experts from Clivedon Conservation.

An artist's impression of the Durley Hill villa which produced the excavated mosaics.

An artist’s impression of the Durley Hill villa

They were able to get up close to the marvellous mosaics discovered when the cemetery was extended in the 1920s.

Mosaic panels will be set in the floor of a room in the new building with another panel hung on a nearby wall.

The Virtual Museum had a chance to speak to Andy Hebden – one of the conservators who has been working on the panels – to get the latest on their eventual move to a new home.

 

 

 

 

 

Visitors were also able to explore other archaeological finds from Keynsham including decorative stonework from the Medieval Abbey, as well as finds and some unusual graffiti rescued from the Combe Down Stone Mines before they were filled in during the stabilisation works.

 

Keynsham’s Roman history on display

Keynsham’s Roman history on display

Roman mosaic panels from the Durley Hill Roman villa will go on display in Bath & North East Somerset Council’s new Keynsham development when it opens later this year. You can see how they are being cleaned and conserved by expert conservators from Cliveden Conservation in preparation for that display at a free event on Saturday 10 May.

Roman mosaics

Roman mosaics

On this open day – held at the Pixash Lane Archaeology Store – you can see conservation work in action and get up close to the marvellous mosaics discovered when the cemetery was extended in the 1920s.

An illustration featuring Europa and the bull!

An illustration featuring Europa and the bull!

You can talk to the conservators working on the project and curatorial staff from the Roman Baths will be on hand to talk about the style and significance of the mosaics and about other recent archaeological discoveries in the Keynsham area.

At the same time you will be able to explore other archaeological finds from Keynsham including decorative stonework from the Medieval Abbey, as well as finds and some unusual graffiti rescued from the Combe Down Stone Mines before they were filled in during the stabilisation works.

Another Abbey relic.

Another Abbey relic.

Young people can also have fun looking for objects on our trail through the archaeological store and designing their own Medieval floor tiles

Cllr Ben Stevens (Lib-Dem, Widcombe), Cabinet member for Sustainable Development, said: “Whilst the public has witnessed Bath & North East Somerset Council’s ongoing Keynsham town centre development, work has also been going on behind the scenes to prepare the Durley Hill villa mosaics for display. This gives local people a great opportunity to see some of that work in progress, ask questions about local archaeology and meet some of the people involved in the project.”

The Archaeology Store is next to the recycling centre on Pixash Lane and will be open to the public from 11am to 3pm.

Ancient wall in Keynsham repaired.

Ancient wall in Keynsham repaired.

Work has been undertaken to restore and protect a historic stone wall in Keynsham following calls from local Conservative councillor Alan Hale.

The ancient stone wall, which forms the gateway to the town’s Dapps Hill conservation area, was riddled with vegetation growing through it and deemed at risk of potential collapse at certain spots.

No action had been taken to protect the wall for many years, with nobody claiming ownership of the wall and the local Council refusing to take on responsibility for the wall’s maintenance. Several calls for action from local residents over the years had fallen on deaf ears at Bath and North East Somerset Council, with officers saying only that the Council would clear any debris if parts of the wall collapsed to ensure public safety.

Cllr Alan Hale at the Dapps Hill stone wall.

Cllr Alan Hale at the Dapps Hill stone wall.

However, following several months of pressure from Councillor Hale, including a visit to the site by Council officers, Bath and North East Somerset Council agreed to take on the job of clearing the vegetation from the wall and protecting its structure.

Councillor Alan Hale (Cons, Keynsham South), said:

“In Keynsham we have lost most evidence of our town’s history over the years, making it even more important to preserve that which remains. This wall is part of the Dapps Hill Conservation Area and so it was vital that it be repaired for the benefit of the whole town, and in its restored form it looks very impressive.

“I am pleased that by getting involved in this issue on behalf of local residents a resolution was eventually agreed that has resulted in the appearance of the area being enhanced. I am grateful to the officers on this occasion for acting in the best interests of the community.”

Local resident Roger Busby, who had also pressed the Council for action on the wall, commented:

“The residents of Dapps Hill have been trying to get this wall repaired over many years. It is recorded on the Heritage at Risk Register and we appreciate that at last, with the help of Councillor Hale’s intervention, it has been repaired.”

Name that building! Keynsham residents to shape history.

Name that building! Keynsham residents to shape history.

Local people are being invited to shape history and have their say about what names Bath & North East Somerset Council should consider for the new buildings that are part of Keynsham town centre’s regeneration.

keynshamThe £34 million regeneration site is due to open by Autumn 2014 and the Council wants to involve Keynsham residents in shortlisting possible names for buildings. No decisions have been taken on whether the whole site should have a name or whether individual names should be adopted for the different facilities, like the Library and One Stop Shop.

Councillor David Bellotti (Lib-Dem, Lyncombe), Cabinet Member for Community Resources, said, “This is a chance for Keynsham residents to shape history and have their say on a major decision that Bath & North East Somerset Council must make. We want to get as many ideas as possible from the community and select the one from a shortlist which best represents what people want.

“I’d like to welcome the comments we’ve had so far about the possibilities for names and these will be included as part of this exercise. The selection process will create sense of excitement in the Keynsham community about the completion of this project and the fact we are just months away from opening.”

How to get involved today

People can submit their views on whether there should be:

a) A single name for the overall site, including the retail units, library/ one stop shop and Council offices;
Or

b) Names for individual buildings, such as for the library/ one stop shop;
And

c) What those name/s should be.
There are a variety of ways in which people can contribute.

Via online consultation from Friday 4 April 2014 at http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/keynshamregen

Emailing the Council via regen_keynsham@bathnes.gov.uk

Writing to the Council at – Keynsham Civic building name, Floor 1 Guildhall, High Street, Bath, BA1 5AW

Keynsham schools will be written to inviting Head Teacher’s to ask their pupils what name they would give the new building.

People have until Tuesday 22 April 2014 to submit their ideas.

 

January sale at Recycling Centre.

January sale at Recycling Centre.

Another second-hand furniture sale is being held by Bath & North East Somerset Council on Saturday 18 January 2014 from 10am to 12 noon at the old MOD building (next to the Recycling Centre) at Pixash Lane, Keynsham BS31 1TP.

Keynsham High Street

Keynsham High Street

There will be a variety of items on sale, all of which have been brought to our Recycling Centres by residents and are in good enough condition for reuse. Instead of being recycled or sent to landfill, we will offer them first to residents. There will be a selection of furniture such as sofas, coffee tables, cupboards, dining tables and chairs, chests of drawers on sale (cash only) at bargain prices.

Contact Council Connect on councilconnect@bathnes.gov.uk or 01225 39 40 41 to find out more information.