Keynsham mosaics to get new home

Keynsham mosaics to get new home

 

The panel array that will be sunk in the floor at the new Civic Centre

The panel array that will be sunk in the floor at the new Civic Centre

Work is well underway now to prepare a selection of mosaic panels -

The panel that will eventually hang on the wall.

The panel that will eventually hang on the wall.

from the Durley Hill Roman villa – for a new home in the £34 million Civic Centre which is nearing completion in Keynsham.

Visitors to the town’s Pixash Lane Archaeology Store today (Saturday, May 10th) were able to see how they are being cleaned and conserved by experts from Clivedon Conservation.

An artist's impression of the Durley Hill villa which produced the excavated mosaics.

An artist’s impression of the Durley Hill villa

They were able to get up close to the marvellous mosaics discovered when the cemetery was extended in the 1920s.

Mosaic panels will be set in the floor of a room in the new building with another panel hung on a nearby wall.

The Virtual Museum had a chance to speak to Andy Hebden – one of the conservators who has been working on the panels – to get the latest on their eventual move to a new home.

 

 

 

 

 

Visitors were also able to explore other archaeological finds from Keynsham including decorative stonework from the Medieval Abbey, as well as finds and some unusual graffiti rescued from the Combe Down Stone Mines before they were filled in during the stabilisation works.

 

Keynsham’s Roman history on display

Keynsham’s Roman history on display

Roman mosaic panels from the Durley Hill Roman villa will go on display in Bath & North East Somerset Council’s new Keynsham development when it opens later this year. You can see how they are being cleaned and conserved by expert conservators from Cliveden Conservation in preparation for that display at a free event on Saturday 10 May.

Roman mosaics

Roman mosaics

On this open day – held at the Pixash Lane Archaeology Store – you can see conservation work in action and get up close to the marvellous mosaics discovered when the cemetery was extended in the 1920s.

An illustration featuring Europa and the bull!

An illustration featuring Europa and the bull!

You can talk to the conservators working on the project and curatorial staff from the Roman Baths will be on hand to talk about the style and significance of the mosaics and about other recent archaeological discoveries in the Keynsham area.

At the same time you will be able to explore other archaeological finds from Keynsham including decorative stonework from the Medieval Abbey, as well as finds and some unusual graffiti rescued from the Combe Down Stone Mines before they were filled in during the stabilisation works.

Another Abbey relic.

Another Abbey relic.

Young people can also have fun looking for objects on our trail through the archaeological store and designing their own Medieval floor tiles

Cllr Ben Stevens (Lib-Dem, Widcombe), Cabinet member for Sustainable Development, said: “Whilst the public has witnessed Bath & North East Somerset Council’s ongoing Keynsham town centre development, work has also been going on behind the scenes to prepare the Durley Hill villa mosaics for display. This gives local people a great opportunity to see some of that work in progress, ask questions about local archaeology and meet some of the people involved in the project.”

The Archaeology Store is next to the recycling centre on Pixash Lane and will be open to the public from 11am to 3pm.

Ancient wall in Keynsham repaired.

Ancient wall in Keynsham repaired.

Work has been undertaken to restore and protect a historic stone wall in Keynsham following calls from local Conservative councillor Alan Hale.

The ancient stone wall, which forms the gateway to the town’s Dapps Hill conservation area, was riddled with vegetation growing through it and deemed at risk of potential collapse at certain spots.

No action had been taken to protect the wall for many years, with nobody claiming ownership of the wall and the local Council refusing to take on responsibility for the wall’s maintenance. Several calls for action from local residents over the years had fallen on deaf ears at Bath and North East Somerset Council, with officers saying only that the Council would clear any debris if parts of the wall collapsed to ensure public safety.

Cllr Alan Hale at the Dapps Hill stone wall.

Cllr Alan Hale at the Dapps Hill stone wall.

However, following several months of pressure from Councillor Hale, including a visit to the site by Council officers, Bath and North East Somerset Council agreed to take on the job of clearing the vegetation from the wall and protecting its structure.

Councillor Alan Hale (Cons, Keynsham South), said:

“In Keynsham we have lost most evidence of our town’s history over the years, making it even more important to preserve that which remains. This wall is part of the Dapps Hill Conservation Area and so it was vital that it be repaired for the benefit of the whole town, and in its restored form it looks very impressive.

“I am pleased that by getting involved in this issue on behalf of local residents a resolution was eventually agreed that has resulted in the appearance of the area being enhanced. I am grateful to the officers on this occasion for acting in the best interests of the community.”

Local resident Roger Busby, who had also pressed the Council for action on the wall, commented:

“The residents of Dapps Hill have been trying to get this wall repaired over many years. It is recorded on the Heritage at Risk Register and we appreciate that at last, with the help of Councillor Hale’s intervention, it has been repaired.”

Name that building! Keynsham residents to shape history.

Name that building! Keynsham residents to shape history.

Local people are being invited to shape history and have their say about what names Bath & North East Somerset Council should consider for the new buildings that are part of Keynsham town centre’s regeneration.

keynshamThe £34 million regeneration site is due to open by Autumn 2014 and the Council wants to involve Keynsham residents in shortlisting possible names for buildings. No decisions have been taken on whether the whole site should have a name or whether individual names should be adopted for the different facilities, like the Library and One Stop Shop.

Councillor David Bellotti (Lib-Dem, Lyncombe), Cabinet Member for Community Resources, said, “This is a chance for Keynsham residents to shape history and have their say on a major decision that Bath & North East Somerset Council must make. We want to get as many ideas as possible from the community and select the one from a shortlist which best represents what people want.

“I’d like to welcome the comments we’ve had so far about the possibilities for names and these will be included as part of this exercise. The selection process will create sense of excitement in the Keynsham community about the completion of this project and the fact we are just months away from opening.”

How to get involved today

People can submit their views on whether there should be:

a) A single name for the overall site, including the retail units, library/ one stop shop and Council offices;
Or

b) Names for individual buildings, such as for the library/ one stop shop;
And

c) What those name/s should be.
There are a variety of ways in which people can contribute.

Via online consultation from Friday 4 April 2014 at http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/keynshamregen

Emailing the Council via regen_keynsham@bathnes.gov.uk

Writing to the Council at – Keynsham Civic building name, Floor 1 Guildhall, High Street, Bath, BA1 5AW

Keynsham schools will be written to inviting Head Teacher’s to ask their pupils what name they would give the new building.

People have until Tuesday 22 April 2014 to submit their ideas.

 

January sale at Recycling Centre.

January sale at Recycling Centre.

Another second-hand furniture sale is being held by Bath & North East Somerset Council on Saturday 18 January 2014 from 10am to 12 noon at the old MOD building (next to the Recycling Centre) at Pixash Lane, Keynsham BS31 1TP.

Keynsham High Street

Keynsham High Street

There will be a variety of items on sale, all of which have been brought to our Recycling Centres by residents and are in good enough condition for reuse. Instead of being recycled or sent to landfill, we will offer them first to residents. There will be a selection of furniture such as sofas, coffee tables, cupboards, dining tables and chairs, chests of drawers on sale (cash only) at bargain prices.

Contact Council Connect on councilconnect@bathnes.gov.uk or 01225 39 40 41 to find out more information.

 

 

At your convenience

At your convenience

toilet-sign Full proposals by Bath & North East Somerset Council about the future of its 27 public conveniences have been unveiled by the Cabinet in response to concerns expressed by members of the public and councillors in September.

Councillor David Dixon (Lib-Dem, Oldfield), Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods, said, “The £3.3 million contract remains the same for Bath & North East Somerset Council to work with a company to improve thirteen of our public conveniences. After listening to the public on key aspects of concern, the changes to our original proposals are twofold.

“Firstly, the Automatic Public Conveniences at Charlotte Street and Shaftesbury Road are added to the contract until 2020 at no additional cost to the Council. Secondly, the five toilets which had been earmarked for closure but for which there is currently no alternative provision will remain open on the current basis for up to one year to offer the opportunity for their long-term future to be settled.

“It is important that we get the balance right between offering high quality, well placed public conveniences and an affordable proposition for local taxpayers for the long-term future of these facilities.”

The proposal will be part of the budget for 2014/15 that will be considered by the Council in February 2014. The extra money required to maintain those toilets that were originally to be closed with no alternative is £120,000 and is proposed to be funded from reserves.

Full breakdown of the proposals

  • Toilets part of the investment programme; Riverside Coach Park, Charlotte St Car Park, Royal Victoria Park play area, Parade Gardens, Memorial Park, Keynsham, Odd Down Park & Ride, Sydney Gardens, Alice Park, Henrietta Park, Monksdale Road, Alexandra Park, Monmouth Street and The Shallows in Saltford;

Approach Golf Course already handed over to Aquaterra, whilst a new facility will open at Newbridge Park & Ride.

  • Temporary cleaning, locking and repairs only arrangement; Ashton Way, Keynsham (until the town centre is redeveloped in Autumn 2014), Gullock Tyning, Midsomer Norton (until mid-2015 when the leisure contract is awarded with public convenience provision included)
  • Up to one year cleaning, locking and repairs only arrangement; Dominion Road – Twerton, High Street – Weston, Bradford Road – Combe Down, Larkhall Square and Peasedown St John. We will work with the community and ward councillors to assess a business case for each;
  • Current APCs at Charlotte Street and Shaftesbury Road to continue until 2020;
  • Batheaston and Paulton Parish Council are working with the Council to take over running the public conveniences in these locations.
  • APC contract at Midsomer Norton terminated in agreement with the Town Council as part of the Town Hall Community Asset Transfer;
  • Royal Victoria Park Pavilion to close as planned early in the 2014. Alternatives will be available nearby at Charlotte Street APC and the car park block.

 

Gull measures to go to Council in New Year

Gull measures to go to Council in New Year

 

Bath and North East Somerset Council has issued a statement thanking the 50 or so residents, business owners and visitors who came together this week to discuss how to tackle the urban gull population in the city. Those present included representatives from other councils, pest control organisations and universities.seagulls

Today's debate at the Guildhall.

Wednesday’s debate at the Guildhall.

The scrutiny inquiry day at the Guildhall – aimed at reducing the gulls’ food source caused by litter and exposed waste – heard a range of views and ideas put forward for potential actions to tackle the gull menace.

These will now be considered in detail by the Panel and a report agreed in the New Year for presentation to the Council’s Cabinet.

 

 

 

Green belt housing? Have your say!

Green belt housing? Have your say!

Five locations where land is to be released from the Green Belt for development have been identified by Bath & North East Somerset Council. Consultation will now take place on these locations with the opportunity to attend a series of events.IMG_3817

The Council’s plans are being scrutinised by a Government Inspector and he has asked the Council to provide more details about these proposed developments.  In particular he has asked the Council to define more precisely which parcels of land are to be removed from the Green Belt for development. The locations are:

*       Land at Odd Down, Bath
*       Land north of Weston, Bath
*       Land east of Keynsham
*       Land South west of Keynsham
*       Land at Whitchurch

The Council is consulting on these amendments or a 6 week period from 11th November until 20th December to enable residents and others to comment. Anyone can make comments on these proposals and if they object, they will have the opportunity to express the views at the forthcoming examination hearings.  These are due to be held in March 2013.

The Inspector will hear all the views presented to him and come to a conclusion on whether the Council’s proposals should be implemented or changed.  He will set his conclusions out in a report to the Council which will probably be in the summer of 2014.

IMG_3819During the 6 week consultation period, the Council will hold a series of exhibitions in Bath, Keynsham and at Whitchurch where Council officers will be present to explain the Council’s proposals and answer questions.  Anyone is welcome to attend these exhibitions.

Wednesday 13th November

3pm-5pm

South Stoke Parish Hall

Wednesday 13th November

6pm-8pm

Odd Down, St Gregory’s College

Thursday 14th November

3pm-7pm

Weston All Saints Centre

Tuesday 19th November

3pm-7pm

Whitchurch United Reformed Church

Thursday 21st November

3pm-7pm

Keynsham Key Centre

For all up-to-date information on the Core Strategy Examination visit www.bathnes.gov.uk/corestrategy<http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/corestrategy>

Keynsham mosaics on the move.

Keynsham mosaics on the move.

 

The Keynsham Millennium Mosaics have been relocated and renovated following an agreement between Bath & North East Somerset Council and Keynsham Town Council.

Plan of Keynsham Memorial Park.

Plan of Keynsham Memorial Park.

The mosaics were created by a community group at the turn of the century to celebrate important milestones over the past 100 years of the town. They were previously displayed in the Town Centre prior to the regeneration project starting. The mosaics are now relocated around Keynsham Memorial Park.

A more recent mosaic from the mosaic trail in the Memorial Park.

A more recent mosaic from the mosaic trail in the Memorial Park.

The Town Council has now agreed to adopt the Mosaics.  The Chairman of Bath & North East Somerset Council, Councillor Neil Butters, met with the Chairman of Keynsham Town Council, Councillor Gill Hellier to receive a peppercorn payment for the transfer of the Mosaics.

The mosaics have been cleaned and renovated by the original artist Roz Wates and moved by Willmott Dixon – the Council’s town centre regeneration contractors. They depict:

*       Keynsham in Roman Timeskeynsham mosaic
*       Legend of St Keyna
*       The Hanging Tree
*       Keynsham in Wartime 1939 – 1945
*       The Great Storm of 1968
*       Fry’s and Cadbury
*       Millennium
*       Freeman of the town (Marcus Trescothick)

keynsham mosaicCouncillor Neil Butters, Chairman of Bath & North East Somerset Council, said, “We are very pleased to handover the mosaics to the Town Council which symbolise the new millennium. There are great changes taking place in Keynsham town centre and both councils will be really pleased to have found a place for these symbols of history.”

Councillor Gill Hellier, Chairman of Keynsham Town Council, said, “We are pleased that a number of the mosaics, which were created by the community for the Millennium, have been repaired and are on display in Keynsham Memorial park; these have  been handed over to the Town Council for safe keeping. The Keynsham in Bloom committee will play an active role in maintaining them.

We hope that in future there may be opportunities to replace those that were permanently damaged.”

Open door on heritage.

Open door on heritage.

A variety of heritage sites – including those run by Bath & North East Somerset Council – will be opening their doors and inviting residents and visitors to enjoy their unique attractions and celebrate Heritage Open Week 2013 this half term.

 

Heritage Open Week has been running for over 25 years and celebrates the unique collections and activities available in museums, galleries and heritage sites across Bath and North East Somerset. Over 20 sites will be opening their doors to the public from Saturday 26 October to Sunday 3 November.

 

As part of the family fun, children can get hands on with history and get crafty by making plasticine pets at the Victoria Art Gallery and designing their own stylish creations at the Fashion Museum.

The Great Bath

The Great Bath

 

Late night opening returns to the Roman Baths for one night only on 29 October, from 6pm to 8pm (last entry 7pm). Everyone is welcome to take part in a variety of fun drawing activities and find out more about Roman art.

 

A rare treat is lined up for heritage enthusiasts with a behind-the-scenes look at the Roman Baths local history store. Held in the St John’s Store, Upper Bristol Road, on Monday 28 October, from 11am to 3pm, “What’s in Store?” offers the chance to marvel at the range of historical spa equipment and investigate Victorian writing by reading the original Victorian Spa treatment visitor books, as well as leave your own message for the future!

 

Tracery from Keynsham Abbey

Tracery from Keynsham Abbey

There is also the chance to see archaeological finds from Combe Down Stone Mines and Keynsham, including Roman mosaics and Keynsham Abbey stonework. This second “What’s in Store?” event takes place at the Pixash Lane Store, next to the Recycling Centre, between Saltford and Keynsham on Saturday 2 November, from 11am to 2pm.

 

Councillor Ben Stevens (Lib-Dem, Widcombe), Cabinet Member for Sustainable Development, said: “Bath & North East Somerset Council is proud to organise Heritage Open Week and celebrate the area’s distinctive array of heritage sites with this special programme of activities.

Cllr Ben Stevens Lib-Dem Widcombe Cabinet member for Sustainable Development.

Cllr Ben Stevens
Lib-Dem Widcombe
Cabinet member for Sustainable Development.

 

“These events can be a thoroughly rewarding experience as you can find out a lot about Bath and North East Somerset’s rich heritage – which might have otherwise been taken for granted; such as the fascinating archaeological finds in Keynsham. On top of that, there are lots of fun things to do and plenty of great ways to keep the kids entertained over the half term holidays.”

 

Entry to the Council-run museums for their Heritage Open Week events is free of charge to Bath & North East Somerset Council residents upon production of a Discovery Card. Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Please note that not all of the other museums are open free of charge for the whole week and admission charges apply to non-residents.

 

 

Events taking place at Bath & North East Somerset Council’s heritage sites include:

 

Bath's Victoria Art Gallery.

Bath’s Victoria Art Gallery.

Victoria Art Gallery:

 

  • The Big Draw – Draw like a Greek (Saturday 26 October, 11am-3pm): Explore the Parthenon frieze using binoculars.  Create images of people and animals to add to our wall of art.

 

  • Foody favourites (Tuesday 29 October & Thursday 31 October, 10.30am-12noon): Try your hand at still life by drawing artistic fruit and vegetables.

 

  • Great Heritage Hunters (Wednesday 30 October, 10am-4pm): Enjoy our special gallery trail to explore sculpture.  Spot the details and claim a sticker when you’ve found them all.

 

  • Plasticine pets (Friday 1 November, 10.30am-12noon): Get modelling with plasticine, which was invented by William Harbutt from Bath.

 

Fashion Museum:

 

  • The Big Draw: Draw like a fashion designer (Monday 28 October, Tuesday 29 October and Wednesday 30 October, 11am-3pm): Draw your favourite fashion design and enter the drawing contest.

 

  • How to draw like a fashion designer (Sunday 3 November, 2.30pm-4pm): Special activity for 10 to 16 year olds in partnership with the Fashion & Textile Museum, London and publishers Thames & Hudson. Learn how to draw like a fashion designer. Book a free place on 01225 477789 but hurry – spaces are limited.

 

Emma Williamson, Collections Intern at the Roman Baths.

Emma Williamson, Collections Intern at the Roman Baths.

Roman Baths:

 

  • The Big Draw: Draw like an archaeologist (Monday 28 October to Friday 1 November, 10am-1pm & 2pm-4pm): Sketch Roman objects like an archaeologist.

 

  • Big Draw: Drawing the Roman Baths (Tuesday 29 October, 6pm-8pm; last entry 7pm): Take part in a variety of fun drawing activities and find out about Roman art. See how people have drawn pictures of the Roman Baths through the ages.

 

  • Spotlight on Samian (Wednesday 30 October, 10am-12noon & 2pm-4pm): Enjoy the historic artworks which have been delicately painted on Roman pottery.

 

For full details of Heritage Open Week 2013, including listings and the online brochure, visit Bath & North East Somerset Council’s website www.bathnes.gov.uk/openweek or pick up the Heritage Open Week brochure in your local library or museum.

 

A family trail is included at the back of every Heritage Open Week brochure. Aspiring treasure hunters can use it to follow the trail clues around 14 different museum sites to discover a fascinating object and claim a stamp at each museum.